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Jeremiah, Chapter 15

Jeremiah's Second Personal Lament
The first nine verses of this chapter, especially the first four, continue the thought of Chapter 14. Some suggest the following chapter divisions: Judah’s sin beyond the possibility of God's stopping their punishment (Jer.15:1-4); continued prophecy of Judah's destruction (Jer.15:5-9); beginning of Jeremiah's lament (Jer.15:10-11); destruction of Judah inevitable (Jer.15:12-14); Jeremiah's discouragement and denial of his commission (Jer.15:15-18); God's command to Jeremiah with promises depending on his obedience (Jer. 15:19-21).

Chapter 15 reveals that Jeremiah is a brokenhearted man who wants to go to God to pray for his people, which is certainly the right thing to do. But the LORD has something to say to him. The LORD tells Jeremiah that not even Moses and Samuel, whose prayers had been so prevailing, could change His Mind about punishing such a wicked people, (Jer.15:1). Therefore their captivity is again announced in a variety of images that were so full of terror (Jer.15:2), that the prophet complains of his own hard fate in being the one to deliver such unwelcome messages (Jer.15:10); for which too he is rebuked (Jer. 15:11-14). Immediately the prophet appeals to the LORD and begs for pardon (Jer.15:15-18); and God alters His reproof again, promising to protect him in the faithful discharge of his duty (Jer.15:19-21).

God Turns a Deaf Ear to All Intercessions (Jer. 15:1-4)

Jer. 15:1 Then said the LORD unto me, Though Moses and Samuel stood before me, yet my mind could not be toward this people: cast them out of my sight, and let them go forth. (KJV)

Moses and Samuel were historical heroes of the Jewish people, who, upon serious occasions of Israel's rebellion against the LORD, had interceded for them, praying for their forgiveness; there were several examples of this in the Old Testament (Ex. 32:11-14, 30-34; Deut. 9:18-20; 1 Sam. 7:5-9; 12:19-25; Ps. 99:6-8). But, the sad message here is that even the intercession of such great intercessors as Moses and Samuel, there would be of no benefit whatsoever in the present extremity of Judah's total apostasy and rebellion.

*****The people have simply gone too far, and judgment must come upon them. They have gone over the borderline where there is absolutely no possibility for pardon. They will not escape captivity. The LORD tells Jeremiah that he should not think that God does not hear his prayers. There was nothing wrong with Jeremiah's prayers. God tells him that even if Moses stood before Him, He would not listen.

Now we can understand why Jeremiah is giving a message of nothing but judgment.

Jer. 15:2 And it shall come to pass, if they say unto thee, Whither shall we go forth? then thou shalt tell them, Thus saith the LORD; Such as are for death, to death; and such as are for the sword, to the sword; and such as are for the famine, to the famine; and such as are for the captivity, to the captivity. (KJV)

If they say unto thee, Whither shall we go forth? If they ask you what you mean by going forth; tell them they are going forth to their ruin and destruction, but not all of them shall be destroyed just one way . . . some shall be destroyed by pestilence, meaning death, others shall be destroyed by the famine, others by the sword of enemies, others shall go into captivity . . . but one way or another the land shall be rid of the most of them.

Jer. 15:3 And I will appoint over them four kinds, saith the LORD: the sword to slay, and the dogs to tear, and the fowls of the heaven, and the beasts of the earth, to devour and destroy. (KJV)

There would be four kinds of destroyers; the enemies' swords shall slay them, and would make meat for the dogs, who shall tear their carcasses, and for the birds of prey, who shall prey upon their dead bodies that shall lie unburied. And the LORD will also send wild beasts among them, who shall both tear their living bodies and their dead carcasses.

Jer. 15:4 And I will cause them to be removed into all kingdoms of the earth, because of Manasseh the son of Hezekiah king of Judah, for that which he did in Jerusalem. (KJV)

Although most of the people were taken into Babylon, yet it is likely that many of them fled into other countries to save themselves. There is no doubt that the king of Babylon moved them into several kingdoms belonging to his large empire. It might appear from this that the invasion and captivity of Judah was the consequences of Manasseh's wicked reign; but it was not that reign alone that resulted in such disasters.
2 Ki. 21:11 Because Manasseh king of Judah hath done these abominations, and hath done wickedly above all that the Amorites did, which were before him, and hath made Judah also to sin with his idols: (KJV)
2 Ki. 21:16 Moreover Manasseh shed innocent blood very much, till he had filled Jerusalem from one end to another; beside his sin wherewith he made Judah to sin, in doing that which was evil in the sight of the LORD. (KJV)
2 Ki. 24:3-4 Surely at the commandment of the LORD came this upon Judah, to remove them out of his sight, for the sins of Manasseh, according to all that he did;
4 And also for the innocent blood that he shed: for he filled Jerusalem with innocent blood; which the LORD would not pardon. (KJV)
Manasseh did wickedly, above all that were before him, and also made Judah to sin with his idols. In addition, he shed so much innocent blood, till he had filled Jerusalem from one end to another, also, he caused Judah to sin. Manasseh lived fifty-five years, his son Josiah thirty-one years, it was now the time of Jehoiakim, the son of Josiah, who reigned just eleven years. It is likely this was Jehoiakim’s fifth year, for in that year he proclaimed the fast for the drought, as is supposed (Jer.36:9).

*****It was because the people persisted in their wickedness, that the judgment came upon them. They resented and disapproved of Josiah's reforms; and as soon as Jehoiachim came to the throne, they whole-heartedly supported that wicked king's campaign to restore all of the idolatrous ways of Manasseh's evil reign; and, when Jeremiah's perfect prophecies appeared to be a hindrance to such a resurgence of paganism, they plotted to kill Jeremiah. It was also that the great majority of Israel preferred the immoral and wicked rites of idolatry far above the righteous government of the LORD that led to their eventual destruction and the deportation of a remnant.

Continued Prophecy of Judah's Destruction (Jer. 15:5-9)

Jer. 15:5 For who shall have pity upon thee, O Jerusalem? or who shall bemoan thee? or who shall go aside to ask how thou doest? (KJV)

They shall fall without being pitied. When their God has cast them out of His sight, and His compassions fail and are shut up from them, neither their enemies nor their friends will have any compassion for them. They will have no sympathy from anyone; no one would mourn for them or be sorry for them. There will be no concern for them, and no one shall take one step out of their way to ask how they are.

Jer. 15:6 Thou hast forsaken me, saith the LORD, thou art gone backward: therefore will I stretch out my hand against thee, and destroy thee; I am weary with repenting. (KJV)

The whole nation had returned to the idolatry of the reign of Manasseh. Judah was aware of the great Truth that when they repented the LORD would turn and bless them again, as is fully explained by Jeremiah a little later in this prophecy (Jer.18:7-10) . . . but this brings up something that Judah had either forgotten or had never even known . . . that being the fact that there is a point of no return in the persistent wickedness of any man or of any nation. It was evident in the classical account of Balaam, who set out on a rebellious course, opposing God's instructions; and when the going became really rough, he said, I will get me back again (Num.22:34); but God commanded him, saying, Go with the men (Num.22:35). There always comes the time in one’s rebellion against God, that an angel with a drawn sword stands in the way and says, Go on in the way you have chosen; you have made your bed, now lie in it; you have preferred to rebel, now abide by the consequences! Dear one, even the forgiveness given out to the repentant sinner in many cases can never cancel out the physical consequences of a sinful life.
I am weary with repenting (Hos.13:14; 11:8). The LORD had so often repented of the evil that He threatened (Jer. 26:19; Ex 32:14; 1 Chron. 21:15), and had spared them, but His patience did not move them to repentance, that He will not again change His purpose,  but will take vengeance on them now.

Jer. 15:7 And I will fan them with a fan in the gates of the land; I will bereave them of children, I will destroy my people, since they return not from their ways. (KJV)

I will fan them with a fan in the gates of the land . . . not a purging fan by affliction, to separate their chaff and dross from them, but a scattering fan. Some translate it into the gates of the Earth. It is the same that God had before said, that he would remove them into all nations, gates meaning cities.
I will bereave them of children . . . it could well be, of any or all their comforts or good things.
I will destroy my people, since they return not from their ways . . .their privilege was that they claimed of being God’s people, but it shall not protect them, as long as they go on in their lewd and sinful courses.

Jer. 15:8 Their widows are increased to me above the sand of the seas: I have brought upon them against the mother of the young men a spoiler at noonday: I have caused him to fall upon it suddenly, and terrors upon the city. (KJV)

Their widows are increased to me above the sand of the seas . . . so numerous have they now grown. It was promised that the men of Israel should be as the sand of the sea for multitude (Gen.32:12; Judg.7:12); but now they shall all be cut off, and their widows shall be as the sand of the seas. Have brought, prophetical past: I will bring. Mother of the young men, He naturally mentions bereavement of their young men, brought on the mothers by the spoiler (Jer.6:26; 48:18; 51:56; Isa.16:4; 21:2); it was owing to the number of men slain that the widows were so many. At noonday . . . the hottest part of the day, when military operations were usually suspended; so it means unexpectedly (Ps. 91:6). I have caused him (the spoiler) to fall upon it suddenly, bringing sudden anguish and terror.

Jer. 15:9 She that hath borne seven languisheth: she hath given up the ghost; her sun is gone down while it was yet day: she hath been ashamed and confounded: and the residue of them will I deliver to the sword before their enemies, saith the LORD. (KJV)

Seven indicates many (1 Sam. 2:5; Job 5:19). The prophet complains that Jerusalem, or the country of Judah, that had been very numerous in people, now was feeble, not able to maintain those she had borne.
Her sun is gone down while it was yet day . . . in the midst of her prosperity she became miserable.
She hath been ashamed and confounded . . . a part of them were puzzled by the judgments of God, which came upon them before their captivity. The rest of them shall be destroyed by the sword of the enemy.

Beginning of Jeremiah's Lament (Jer. 15:10-11)

This message would not increase Jeremiah’s popularity. King Josiah was his friend, but not King Jehoiakim. King Jehoiakim was an evil man, and Jeremiah was the fly in the ointment for Jehoiakim. He considered Jeremiah a troublemaker.

Jer. 15:10 Woe is me, my mother, that thou hast borne me a man of strife and a man of contention to the whole earth! I have neither lent on usury, nor men have lent to me on usury; yet every one of them doth curse me. (KJV)

Woe is me, my mother, that thou hast borne me a man of strife and a man of contention to the whole earth! . . . some commentators say that Jeremiah was cursing the day he was born . . . and to curse the day of his birth was the same as a rejection of his mission. I cannot go along with this. There is a big difference in what is said here and what was said when Job cursed the day of his birth (Job 3:1-6). But Jeremiah's error, whatever it was, needed him to repent (Jer.15:19).

*****The prophet cannot be excused from such passion and human weakness. He almost cursed the day he was born, condemning himself as a sad, miserable man, to be born a man of strife and contention to those nations in which God sent him to prophecy His judgments . . . which were true, and the Truth of which the people later found were indeed true, yet they were not able to bear it . . . and therefore they struggled with him, and opposed him; even though it was not for his sin.
Usury was forbidden the Jews (Deut. 23:19), and so was the more hateful; but the prophet said that he had neither lent nor borrowed, he had one done them no wrong, he had given them no reason to go against him . . . yet they would not be reconciled to him, but spoke all manner of evil against him. This was the same thing they did with the old prophets, Samuel, of Christ Jesus, of His apostles and of all the faithful ministers of the Gospel ever since. They carry themselves ever so innocently and willingly to people, yet when they are faithful, and truly reveal to people the mind and will of God, that is more than sufficient to anger people whose wills are not surrendered to the will of God, and they will curse them.

Jer. 15:11 The LORD said, Verily it shall be well with thy remnant; verily I will cause the enemy to entreat thee well in the time of evil and in the time of affliction. (KJV)

The LORD said, Verily it shall be well with thy remnant . . . the LORD told Jeremiah that He would take care of him, set him free, and strengthen him. God fulfilled this Promise!
Verily I will cause the enemy to entreat thee well in the time of evil and in the time of affliction . . . the LORD would, by His providence, so order it, that no matter how brutally and severely Nebuchadnezzar deals with your country, yet he shall be kind to you when he takes the city. See the fulfilling of this prophecy:
Jer. 39:11-18 Now Nebuchadrezzar king of Babylon gave charge concerning Jeremiah to Nebuzaradan the captain of the guard, saying, 12 Take him, and look well to him, and do him no harm; but do unto him even as he shall say unto thee. 13 So Nebuzaradan the captain of the guard sent, and Nebushasban, Rabsaris, and Nergalsharezer, Rabmag, and all the king of Babylon's princes; 14 Even they sent, and took Jeremiah out of the court of the prison, and committed him unto Gedaliah the son of Ahikam the son of Shaphan, that he should carry him home: so he dwelt among the people. 15 Now the word of the LORD came unto Jeremiah, while he was shut up in the court of the prison, saying, 16 Go and speak to Ebedmelech the Ethiopian, saying, Thus saith the LORD of hosts, the God of Israel; Behold, I will bring my words upon this city for evil, and not for good; and they shall be accomplished in that day before thee. 17 But I will deliver thee in that day, saith the LORD: and thou shalt not be given into the hand of the men of whom thou art afraid. 18 For I will surely deliver thee, and thou shalt not fall by the sword, but thy life shall be for a prey unto thee: because thou hast put thy trust in me, saith the LORD. (KJV)

Destruction of Judah Inevitable (Jer. 15:12-14) 

Jer. 15:12 Shall iron break the northern iron and the steel? (KJV)

Can one break iron? There are several views on what this means. (1). One thinks it means that Judah is not strong enough to withstand the Chaldean power. (2). Jeremiah protests that he is not strong enough to stand against the hardness and stubbornness of the people. (3). Jeremiah's prayers are not strong enough to break the iron will of the divine purpose to destroy Judah.

*****Some interpret this as a prophecy that none would break the prophet, whom God would make as the northern iron and steel, which was the hardest of all iron. Chalybes, from whom steel had its name Chalybs, being northern people, and famous for tempering iron to make it hard and tough. The Jews would be overrun and conquered by Babylon; for as the northern iron and steel is the hardest, and no iron could break that, so too God had edged and hardened the Chaldeans, Israel’s opposition to them would mean nothing. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chalybes
Jer. 15:13 Thy substance and thy treasures will I give to the spoil without price, and that for all thy sins, even in all thy borders. (KJV)

This simply states that all of the treasures and riches of Judah would be taken away from them because of their sins. Those treasures would not be paid for, but would leave them without price, and be carried away by Judah's enemies into a country they do not know.

Jer. 15:14 And I will make thee to pass with thine enemies into a land which thou knowest not: for a fire is kindled in mine anger, which shall burn upon you. (KJV)

As in verse 13, so this also must be understood, not of the prophet, for he was not carried into Babylon, but of the people, whose captivity is threatened in this place, and the cause of it declared. The wrath of the LORD is against them for their sins, the effects of His Holy and righteous wrath are compared to a fire that would burn them.

*****The claim by some that verses 12-14 do not fit here is ridiculous. They clearly predict the exile, which prophecy certainly highlights the negative answer God had already given to Judah's appeal for mercy. One called Jer.15:12-14 irrelevant; another called them a digression; but I agree with the one who thinks that they can hardly be regarded as simply an intrusion into the text; because they are a veryn important part of the total picture.

Jeremiah's Discouragement, Denial of His Commission (Jer. 15:15-18) 

Jer. 15:15 O LORD, thou knowest: remember me, and visit me, and revenge me of my persecutors; take me not away in thy longsuffering: know that for thy sake I have suffered rebuke. (KJV)

O LORD, thou knowest . . .  either You know how faithfully I have revealed Your will (Ps.139:1, 23); or You know how I suffer, and how wickedly they deal with me; or You know what You have to do. What is in Your purpose and will to do?
Remember me and visit me . . . that I may never be out of Your thoughts, nor without the visits of Your love, while this people is under the condemnations of Your wrath (Neh.5:19; 13:14; Jer.18:20).
And revenge me of my persecutors . . . You have commanded me not to avenge myself, LORD, do You avenge me upon my persecutors?
Take me not away in thy longsuffering . . .  confirm Your Word, let not me be taken away into captivity; although I am a sinner, give me patience and long-suffering.
Know that for thy sake I have suffered rebuke . . . LORD, remember that my rebuke and all that I suffer, is for Your sake, because I have faithfully spoken Your Truth, and maintained and defended Your honor and glory.

*****O LORD - - - remember me, and visit me . . .  let me not be carried away into captivity . . . it does not appear that the prophet had ever been taken to Babylon. After the capture of the city he went into Egypt; and either died there, or was killed by his countrymen.

Jer. 15:16 Thy words were found, and I did eat them; and thy word was unto me the joy and rejoicing of mine heart: for I am called by thy name, O LORD God of hosts. (KJV)

Thy words were found, and I did eat them . . . (Eze.2:8; 3:1-3; Rev.10:9; Job 23:12) either the words which from time to time the LORD revealed to me were greedily digested; even though some of them were dreadful and terrible words, yet because they proceeded from the LORD, I was glad to hear them, and be His instrument to bring them to the people; or, the LORD’S Word of commission (Jer.1:1-19) by which I was made God’s prophet.
And thy word was unto me the joy and rejoicing of mine heart . . . the LORD’S Word was at first very pleasing and welcome to me; I was glad in my heart, when the LORD revealed His will to me.
For I am called by thy name, O LORD God of hosts . . . Thou art the LORD of hosts, and are so able to protect Your messengers. LORD, I am called by YOUR Name, I became a prophet by YOUR authority, and therefore You do own, protect and defend me.

Jer. 15:17 I sat not in the assembly of the mockers, nor rejoiced; I sat alone because of thy hand: for thou hast filled me with indignation. (KJV)

I sat not in the assembly of the mockers, nor rejoiced . . . some interpret these words as an argument the prophet used with God to obtain His favor, because although the country was full of wicked men, such as those scoffing at God's judgments, yet he had no share with them; therefore he wants no share with those wicked men, in whose company he had no delight, and in whose profane contempt of God he had no share.

*****Jeremiah’s rejoicing (Jer.15:16) was not that of the wicked mockers at feasts (Ps.1:1; 26:4-5). He was so far from having fellowship with these people that he was expelled from society, and made to sit alone, because of the Truth of his prophecies, and because of God’s Hand on him, meaning His inspiration (Isa.8:11; Eze.1:3; 3:14).
For thou hast filled me with indignation . . . filled me with anger. Jer. 6:11 Therefore I am full of the fury of the LORD; I am weary with holding in: I will pour it out upon the children abroad, and upon the assembly of young men together: for even the husband with the wife shall be taken, the aged with him that is full of days. (KJV) . . . Jeremiah was so full of the fury of the Lord against the ungodly . . . with which God had inspired him, he was not able to stop himself from saying it. The same comparison by contrast between the effect of inspiration, and that of wine, both taking a man out of himself, occurs (Ac 2:13, 15, 18).

Jer. 15:18, which refuseth to be healed? wilt thou be altogether unto me as a liar, and as waters that fail? (KJV)

Why is my pain perpetual, and my wound incurable . . . Jeremiah’s pain was the unending persecution to which he was exposed, and his feeling that the LORD had left him alone and without comfort (Mat.27:46). Jeremiah complains of the hard job that God had put on him over and over again, filling his mouth with bitter words of evil against the people, which exposed him to their most cruel, hardhearted rage against him and their harsh persecution of him. His misery seemed like a pain of an open wound, for which was no remedy except patience.
Wilt thou be altogether unto me as a liar . . . Jeremiah, even though a great prophet of the LORD, as was Elijah, was a man subject to like passions like other men. Here he charges the LORD God with unfaithfulness, as if he had betrayed the LORD’S expectations.
And as waters that fail . . . Jeremiah felt as the LORD had been to him as a pit of waters that promised relief , but failed when he had most need of them (Jer.14:3; Job 6:15-18). The LORD’S servants have sometimes been shocked with such passions and temptations (1Sam. 27:1; Ps. 13:1-2; 77:7, 9). It is a hard thing not to see, and yet believe. Jn. 20:29 Jesus saith unto him, Thomas, because thou hast seen me, thou hast believed: blessed are they that have not seen, and yet have believed. (KJV)
The LORD had promised Jeremiah protection from his enemies (Jer. 1:18-19); he felt his weakness meant that God had failed to do so.

*****Jeremiah seems to have fallen into a sad case of self-pity. He had yielded to the "me" virus (me, I, my, mine) . . . he used these personal pronouns of himself fifteen times in verses 15-18. It appears that this great prophet was nearly totally discouraged about the apparent failure of his mission.
Jeremiah's appeal to God include the following: (1). he appeals to God to remember him; he feels forsaken, and defeated by his enemies; (2). he reminds God of his love and respect for His Holy Word; (3). he complains about his loneliness and his being left out of the gatherings of the people; (4). and in Jer.15:18, he seemed to hit rock bottom in despair, waters that fail. It seems that Jeremiah was even tempted to believe that the LORD had become to him a deceiving water hole, which promised refreshment but failed to give it. The weeping prophet came very close to deserving that title here. Jeremiah had expected that, being called to a high office, there would be a continuous intercession upon his behalf; but instead everything seemed so confused to the prophet.  

There is a grotto (cave) called Jeremiah's Grotto which is located at the foot of the very hill where the Cross of Jesus would be raised some 600 years later. Jeremiah is said to have retired there to weep. http://wikimapia.org/7555725/Jeremiah-s-Grotto
For more on Jeremiah's Grotto, see Special Comments at the end of this chapter.

God's Command to Jeremiah,
Promises Depends on His Obedience (Jer. 15:19-21)

Jer. 15:19 Therefore thus saith the LORD, If thou return, then will I bring thee again, and thou shalt stand before me: and if thou take forth the precious from the vile, thou shalt be as my mouth: let them return unto thee; but return not thou unto them. (KJV)

Therefore thus saith the LORD, If thou return . . . Jeremiah, by his impatience, had left the proper attitude towards the LORD. God says, If thou return . . . to his previous patient, fearless and cooperative disposition,
Then will I bring thee again, and thou shalt stand before me . . . I will bring you back to your former position . . . return, turn again (Jer. 4:1; 8:4). Stand before me and minister acceptably to Me (Deut.10:8; 1 Ki.17:1; 18:15).
And if thou take forth the precious from the vile . . . if you will separate what is precious in you (the divine graces conveyed) from what is vile (your natural corruptions, impatience, and hasty words), you shall be as My Mouthpiece (Ex.4:16; 7:1-2; 18:19).
Let them return unto thee; but return not thou unto them . . . do not let not them lead you into their blasphemous ways (for Jeremiah had spoken irreverently Jer.15:18), but lead the people to the ways of godliness (Jer.15:16-17).

*****These words are to be understood as God's commandment for Jeremiah to repent. The great prophet had allowed himself to drift into a dangerous attitude toward God; and it had started to echo in some of the things that entered into his messages to the people. Because of this, God commanded him to separate the precious from the vile. This instruction is priceless for anyone who preaches or teaches the Gospel of Jesus Christ.
God made it clear in these verses that He did not approve of Jeremiah's conduct. If Jeremiah wanted to be back in a place of God's favor, (1). he must repent of his distrust and selfishness; (2). he must rid his message of all that is vile.
If Jeremiah would do these two things, four results will follow. (1). He will again be God's TRUE messenger to the people; (2). He will not follow the wishes of the people, but will cause the people to turn to him eventually for the Word of God; (3). he will become what God promised him in his original call, a fortified wall of bronze (Jer.1:18-19; 15:20); and (4) God will defend and deliver him from evil men (Jer.42:11; Isa.54:17).

Jer. 15:20 And I will make thee unto this people a fenced brasen wall: and they shall fight against thee, but they shall not prevail against thee: for I am with thee to save thee and to deliver thee, saith the LORD. (KJV)

And I will make thee unto this people a fenced brazen wall: these words are explained by those that follow.
And they shall fight against thee, but they shall not prevail against thee . . .men may throw stones or strike at a brazen wall, but cannot hurt it . . . although you shall have enemies, if you continue in the doing your duty, they shall do you no harm;
For I am with thee to save thee and to deliver thee, saith the LORD . . . you shall have My promised power to deliver and save you from their hateful malice.

Jer. 15:21 And I will deliver thee out of the hand of the wicked, and I will redeem thee out of the hand of the terrible. (KJV)

I will deliver thee out of the hand of the wicked . . . the wicked Jews;
And I will redeem thee out of the hand of the terrible . . . and the power of the terrible Chaldeans, into whose hands you shall come . . . you shall be preserved from any harm by the workings of my wisdom for you.

*****Jer. 1:18-19 For, behold, I have made thee this day a defenced city, and an iron pillar, and brasen walls against the whole land, against the kings of Judah, against the princes thereof, against the priests thereof, and against the people of the land. 19 And they shall fight against thee; but they shall not prevail against thee; for I am with thee, saith the LORD, to deliver thee. (KJV) . . . The Promise of Jer.1:18-19, in almost the same words as Jer.15:20-21, but with the addition, adapted to the present attacks of Jeremiah's awful enemies: I will deliver thee out of the hand of the wicked, and I will redeem thee out of the hand of the terrible . . . the repetition is in order to assure Jeremiah that God is the same now as when He first made the Promise, in opposition to the prophet's irreverent accusation of unfaithfulness (Jer.15:18).
God made it clear in these verses that He did not approve of Jeremiah's conduct. If Jeremiah wanted to win a place back in God's favor, he must do the following: (1). he must repent of his distrust and selfishness; (2). he must rid his message of all that is unworthy.
If Jeremiah will do these two things, four results would follow. (1). He will again be God's TRUE messenger to the people; (2). He will not conform to the wishes of the people, but will cause the people to turn to him for the Word of God; (3). he will become what God promised him in his original call, a fortified wall of bronze; and (4). God will defend and deliver him from evil men.
Jeremiah only bared his innermost thoughts before the LORD; and there's nothing wrong with that; but one who has such thoughts as Jeremiah had, must undergo a radical change if he wanted to continue to be God's mouthpiece, as Jeremiah did.

Special Comments

Jeremiah's Grotto

There is a grotto (cave) called Jeremiah's Grotto which is located at the foot of the very hill where the Cross of Jesus would be raised some 600 years later. Jeremiah is said to have retired there to weep. http://wikimapia.org/7555725/Jeremiah-s-Grotto

Jeremiahs Grotto, Israel . . .  just outside the north wall of Jerusalem, where tradition says Jeremiah wept bitter tears and composed the book of Lamentations.
Jeremiah's Grotto (cave), where the prophet hid in a cave, behind the East Jerusalem bus station. Once it was a Holy Site visited by Christians, Jews and Muslims. In the 1930s its importance declined and after 1948 it was forgotten about. Now the entrance is locked and there is not even a sign for it.

Book of Jeremiah

Jer.Ch.1 . . Jer.Ch.2 . . Jer.Ch.3 . . Jer.Ch.4 . . Jer.Ch.5 . . Jer.Ch.6 . . Jer.Ch.7 . . Jer.Ch.8 . . Jer.Ch.9 . . Jer.Ch.10 . . Jer.Ch.11 . . Jer.Ch.12 . . Jer.Ch.13 . . Jer.Ch,14 . . Jer.Ch.15 . . Jer.Ch.16 . . Jer.Ch.17 . . Jer.Ch.18 . . Jer.Ch.19 . . Jer.Ch.20 . . Jer.Ch.21 . . Ch.22 . . Ch.23 . . Ch.24 . . Ch.25 . . Ch.26 . . Ch.27 . . Ch.28 . . Ch.29 . . Ch.30 . . Ch.31 . . Ch.32 . . Ch.33 . . Ch.34 . . Ch.35 . . Ch.36 . . Ch.37 . . Ch.38 . . Ch.39 . . Ch.40 . . Ch.41 . . Ch.42 . . Ch.43 . . Ch.44 . . Ch.45 . Ch.46 . . Ch.47 . . Ch.48 . . Ch.49 . . Ch. 50 . . Ch.51 . . Ch.52 . . Jer. End Times Signs . . Jer. Special Commemnts . . . Home Page

 

 

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